From “You are in the dark, in the car…” by Claudia Rankine

(in celebration of 2015 (US) National Poetry Month)

(Photo Credit: Ricardo DeAratanha/The LA Times)
(Photo Credit: Ricardo DeAratanha/The LA Times)

Claudia Rankine is a Jamaican poet. She has published five collections of poetry. Her latest, Citizen: An American Lyric, is high up on my list of poetry books to buy post-haste.

Today, I feature an excerpt from Citizen. Enjoy!

from ‘You are in the dark, in the car…’

/
You are in the dark, in the car, watching the black-tarred street being swallowed by speed; he tells you his dean is making him hire a person of color when there are so many great writers out there.

You think maybe this is an experiment and you are being tested or retroactively insulted or you have done something that communicates this is an okay conversation to be having.

Why do you feel okay saying this to me? You wish the light would turn red or a police siren would go off so you could slam on the brakes, slam into the car ahead of you, be propelled forward so quickly both your faces would suddenly be exposed to the wind.

As usual you drive straight through the moment with the expected backing off of what was previously said. It is not only that confrontation is headache producing; it is also that you have a destination that doesn’t include acting like this moment isn’t inhabitable, hasn’t happened before, and the before isn’t part of the now as the night darkens 
and the time shortens between where we are and where we are going.
/

When you arrive in your driveway and turn off the car, you remain behind the wheel another ten minutes. You fear the night is being locked in and coded on a cellular level and want time to function as a power wash. Sitting there staring at the closed garage door you are reminded that a friend once told you there exists a medical term — John Henryism — for people exposed to stresses stemming from racism. They achieve themselves to death trying to dodge the build up of erasure. Sherman James, the researcher who came up with the term, claimed the physiological costs were high. You hope by sitting in 
silence you are bucking the trend.

 

(Source: The Poetry Foundation)

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